The Radium Girls.  How Their Stories Compare to Stories of the Vaccine-Injured.

We all sometimes stumble on things that point to our lives.  This one points to mine and many others.  The Radium Girls fought big money and big industry and were made to look as villains by the actual villains.

My babies were injured by their baby shots back in the 1970s—brain-damaged by them to be accurate.  Instead of treating my children for what they suffered, we—the parents—were accused of abusing our children into insanity.

The Radium Girls were not diagnosed with radiation sickness—they were diagnosed with Syphilis.

The parallel?  Shame.  I suffered guilt and shame as did the Radium Girls.  Professionals were telling me I had done something wrong.

They were professionals, right?  They must know what they are talking about.

The victims of Radium were ashamed of the diagnosis of syphilis.  If they told people, those people would assume they were fast and loose and easy…

Radium was touted as being very healthy—having many health advantages.

Supposedly we will die without these toxic shots.  They, too, will keep us healthy and supposedly have many health advantages.

But much like Radium—many, many get sick and die from the shots [and have since their advent.]

Let’s look at the Radium Girls’ story.  Think of us—the vaccine-injured and parents of the vaccine-injured while you do.

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Radium Girls.

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The true story of the shameful failure to protect workers in a radium factory from its harmful effects isn’t escape entertainment. And in Radium Girls

, the movie now streaming at Netflix…

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RADIUM GIRLS Trailer (2020) Joey King, Drama Movie

RADIUM GIRLS Trailer (2020) Joey King, Drama Movie

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Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

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Dean Pilcher and Ginny Moholder have certainly not soft-pedaled the horrendous suffering caused by deliberately hidden truths and harmful guidelines for how to do the job.  If it echoes recent false information about the dangers of the virus and the importance of wearing masks, that is of course what makes Radium Girls painful to watch, and intensely relevant a hundred years after that workplace tragedy unfolded.  The filmmakers have expanded the drama at a New Jersey factory as well as a Midwestern factory, into a broader look at our labor history, especially as it affected women.

The scenario focuses on characters who are composites of actual people. However, the chief characters are two fictionalized, teen-aged sisters from an impoverished family that relies on their wages as “dial painters” in the Orange, New Jersey American Radio Factory — Bessie(Joey King) and Jo (Abby Quinn). Paltry as the wages are they’re better than what poor girls in other factories earned in those days. Bessie and Jo followed in the footsteps of their older sister who died three years earlier.

PRODUCTION NOTES

Radium Girls

Written by Ginny Mohler

Directed by Lydia Dean Pilcher and Ginny Mohler

Principal Players:

Joey King -Bessie, Abby Quinn – Josephine, Cara Seymour – Wiley Stephens, Scott Shepherd – Mr. Leech,

Susan Heyward – Ettak,

Neal Huff – Dr.Flint,

Collin Kelly-Sordelet – Walt, John Bedford Lloyd – Arthur Roeder,

Joe Grifasi Nonno, Brandon Gill – Thomas,

Olivia Macklin – Paula, Colby Minifie -Dorisk,

Greg Hildreth – Henry Berry, Veanne Cox – Dr. Katherine Drinker, Tom Galantich – Radium Lawyer,

Steven Hauck – Dr.Marland, Cafrol Cadby – Mrs.Butkiss,

Gina Piersanti – Hazel, Juliana Sass – Agnes

Music by Lillie Rebecca McDonough

Cinematography Mathieu

It’s pretty obvious from the get-go that the practice of licking the paintbrushes to produce a finer point should have been discouraged rather than encouraged. Except for Bessie, the girls at American Radio see no danger in this practice since this is 1925, a period when Marie Curie’s discovery of radium was hailed not just a scientific miracle but also heavily promoted as a wonderful healing and beauty product. Thus, many of the girls also painted their nails with polish “enhanced” with radium. (Think of the current push to promote vaping as a safe alternative to cigarettes.)

The sisters’ story includes a romance for Bessie and her dream of being an actress alongside increasingly worrisome health issues for Jo. The film’s agitprop sensibility merges all aspects of the plot by making Bessie’s boyfriend Walt (Collin Kelly-Sordelet) a communist who radicalizes Bessie to more actively protect her beloved sister. She insists on getting help — and eventually justice — for her beloved sister. This begins with her keeping after Mr. Roeder, the autocratic factory owner (John Bedford Lloyd), to send the company doctor (Neal Huff) to diagnose and treat Jo.

The doctor’s shamefully false diagnosis and the way the company deals with Jo’s deteriorating condition results in a David-and-Goliath courtroom battle.

Since Radium Girls is based on actual events, don’t count on a happy ending in which Jo gets well, the shut-down of the New Jersey and Illinois “follow the money” factories, plus personal happiness and an acting career for Bessie. But there are some small and potent triumphs nevertheless.

Bessie is supported by Walt and Wiley Stephens (Cara Seymour), local worker advocacy organization’s representative. And the trial features highly dramatic supportive testimonies by Dr. Katherine Drinker (VeanneCox) the Harvard professor who discovered the toxic elements of Radium and Mr. Leech (Scott Shepherd), the factory scientist.

The filmmakers do push too hard on the “wokeness”

Read More Here

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4th Wall Dramaturgy discover solutions to radium girls study-guide

2018-2019 SEASON

Read More HERE

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THE RADIUM GIRLS, Glowing Green After Licking Poisoned Paint Brushes. At Victim’s Grave in Ottawa IL

We pay respects at the grave of one of the prominent victims of this infamous event, at St. Columba Cemetery in Ottawa, Illinois.

FOTF Merch Store – https://facesoftheforgotten.itemorder.com/sale

LET’S HELP BUY GRAVESTONES FOR THOSE WHO HAVE NOT. Consider helping support this channel, because sadly, sometimes I come across a known grave location with no marker, and sometimes I have bought that person a gravestone. Your donations here can help offset some of these costs.  We have some folks already helping to build a pot for this. Let’s try to make some of those names forgotten – remembered.

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THIS STORY:

The Radium Girls were female factory workers who contracted radiation poisoning from painting watch dials with self-luminous paint. After being told that the paint was harmless, the women in each facility ingested deadly amounts of radium after being instructed to “point” their brushes on their lips in order to give them a fine tip; some also painted their fingernails, face and teeth with the glowing substance. Many of the workers became sick; it is unknown how many died from exposure to radiation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radium_Girls

SEE THE MOVIE ON NETFLIX – https://www.netflix.com/title/81059876

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Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

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Radioactive Cosmetics

The 1898 discovery of radium by Marie and Pierre Curie generated a great deal of scientific interest and, before long, medical and other commercial uses were found for this radioactive material.

[Radium] became involved in the physical system of alpha, beta, and gamma rays and the atomic structure; in the chemical system of atomic weights, emanations, and transmutations; in the medical system of cancer treatments and radon spas; in the commercial system of luminous watches, women’s cosmetics, and medical remedies; in the artistic system of luminous paintings and middle-class American culture; and in the industrial system of radium extractions, the production of luminous paint, and the beauty industry.

(Rentetzi, 2007, p. 1)

Medical and other uses of radium

Medically, radium was usually injected or taken in pills. It was used to treat a wide range of ailments including hair loss, impotence, atherosclerosis, high blood pressure, rheumatism, gout, sciatica, nephritis and anaemia. This led to a craze for radium-based products, and radioactivity in general, during the 1920s and 1930s. It was added to a wide range of commercial products including: wool for babies, water dispensers, chocolate, soda water, male supports, foundation garments, condoms, toothpaste, suppositories, cigarettes, cleaning products, boot polish, fertilisers, luminous paints and cosmetics. All of these commercial applications had a common theme; that the rays given off by radium had a ‘vitalising’ effect on the human body.

Cosmetics

A number of companies put radioactive materials into cosmetics. As the original work on radium was carried out by the French scientists, Marie and Pierre Curie, it is not surprising that this was more common in France than elsewhere. England also had a number of cosmetic companies that used radium but the same cannot be said of the United States.

Radior

From about 1917, the London-based Radior company began marketing a line of cosmetics containing radium, including a Night Cream, Rouge, Compact Powder, Vanishing Cream, Talcum Powder, Hair Tonic, Skin Soap, Face Powder in six tints (Blanche, Naturelle, Rachel, Flesh, Ochre and Brunette) and assorted pads that could be strapped to the face.

An ever-flowing Fountain of Youth and Beauty has at last been found in the Energy Rays of Radium.


  • When scientists discovered Radium they hardly dreamed they had unearthed a revolutionary “Beauty Secret.” They know it now. Radium Rays vitalize and energize all living tissue. This Energy has been turned into Beauty’s aid. Each and every ‘Radior’ Toilet Requisite contains a definite quantity of Actual Radium.
  • (Radior advertisement, 1918)

The product sold well in Britain, possibly due to the fact that it was distributed by Boots “in all their five hundred and eighty-five stores” (Foster, 1920, p. 29) as well as Harrods, Selfridges, Whiteley’s, Marshall & Snelgroves and other outlets. It was also available in selected stores in some parts of the British Empire.

  • “Radior” Chin straps are guaranteed to contain Radio-active substance and Radium Bromide. If placed on the face where the skin has become wrinkled or tired the radio-active forces immediately take effect on the nerves and tissues. A continuous steady current of energy flows into the skin, and before long the wrinkles have disappeared, the nerves have become strong and energised, and the tired muscles have become braced up and “ready for service.”
  • (Radior advertisement, 1915)

The product did less well in America when introduced there. In an interview, a company spokesperson noted that market research put the cause for poor sales on the reduced use of radium in U.S. medicine and public disbelief that such an expensive material could be used in cosmetic pads. The spokesperson explained that it was “possible to divide and subdivide radium until you can get as small an amount as one sixty-fourth of a cent’s worth. It seems incredible, I know, but chemists are used to these infinitesimal divisions. The radium would still be genuine and would retain all its valuable properties. For this reason and because of its enormous strength we are able to use it in these pads and still sell them at a profit.” (Foster, 1920, p. 29). Radior countered the misconception with a guarantee that radium was present in every product. Fortunately, sales of Radior remained low in the United States and those individuals that did use the products were exposed to very low levels of radiation.

Tho-Radia

In 1933, a pharmacist, Alexis Moussali and a Parisian doctor, Alfred Curie, launched a French range of radioactive beauty products, first from the Rue des Capucines and then from 146 Avenue Victor Hugo. Alexis Moussali was probably the brains behind the commercial operation, with Dr. Alfred Curie – if he actually existed – brought along because of his surname – Marie and Pierre Curie had no relation of that name.

Tho-Radia display at a trade show.

The product range, which included a cleansing milk, skin cream, powder, rouge, lipstick and toothpaste, was called Tho-Radia as it contained thorium chloride and radium bromide, both of which are radioactive. The products were relatively expensive for the time, possibly due, in part, to the cost of the radioactive materials.  As with Radior, one hopes that the expense of the ‘active ingredients’ may have resulted in reduced amounts of thorium and radium being incorporated into the cosmetics.

The Tho-Radia cream was sold for 15 francs per 155 gram pot; soap, 3 francs per 100 gram bar; powder, 12 francs per 50 gram box; toothpaste, 6 francs per tube. Despite the relatively high price, it sold throughout France from 1933 through to the early 1960s but I have not found any evidence that they had a distributor in the English-speaking world. When tested in the 1960s, the products were still found to be radioactive (Mould, n.d. p. 3).

Like other products of the time, Tho-Radia was advertised as being a scientific method of beauty (Méthod Scientific de Beauté). The medical ‘benefits’ of radium had been highly publicised in the French press and were well known by the French populace in the 1930s. Product advertising shows a face lit from below which makes it look like it is ‘glowing’. What could be healthier than a glowing complexion?

An associated booklet produced by the company makes the following claims:

Elle stimule la vitalité cellulaire active la circulation, élimine la graisse, empêche la déformation des pores, previent et guérit dartres, boutons, rougeurs, défend la peau contre les miasmas et les intempéries, combat toutes les altérations de l’épipiderme, evite at supprime les rides, conserve la fraîcheur et l’éclat du teint.

Translation:
Stimulates cellular vitality, activates circulation, firms skin, eliminates fats, stops enlarged pores forming, stops and cures boils, pimples, redness, pigmentation, protects from the elements, stops ageing and gets rid of wrinkles, conserves the freshness and brightness of the complexion.

(Dictionnaire soins de beauté. p. 37) Artes

In 1933, a new radium rejuvenating cream was launched on the British cosmetic market. Made in London, using imported radium, it was claimed that it “assists blood circulation and generally tones up the skin.” Rather than containing radium salts the cream was made using radium gas.

The use of radium itself would, of course, be impossible on account of the tremendous cost and harmful effect on the skin. Radon, however, which is the gas obtained from radium, impregnated into the cream, is the constituent which gives the cream its value.


There can be no danger of ill-effects through accumulation because radon is completely eliminated from the skin within a period of six hours. We understand that this form of treatment has the approval of the medical and scientific authorities both in England and on the continent.

(Hairdresser and Beauty Trade, 1933)

Kemolite and other mud treatments

The 1920s saw the widespread use of complexion clays both in salons and in home treatments. One variation on this trend was to use radioactive mud, the most common form being Kemolite Radio-Active Beauty Plasma, advertised as a volcanic mud from the Carpathian mountains.

Wrinkles and Lines.—When applied DAILY over these creasings of the skin “Kemolite” will restore smoothness and freedom from Lines and Wrinkles.
Sagging Muscles and Lost Facial Contour.—“Kemolite” tones up relaxed muscles, tissues and nerves.


Acne or Blackheads, Blotches, Rashes, Redness, and roughness.—“Kemolite” proves a wonderful corrective of these conditions when used regularly.
Freckles and Sunburn.—There is nothing better than “Kemolite,” as a fair trial will demonstrate.


Sallowness, Oily, Shiny, or Damp Skin.—“Kemolite” improves the action of the pores and of the capillary blood vessels, and restores the skin and its complexion to their normal condition and colouring.

(Kemolite advertisement, 1922)

Read More HERE

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TRUSTING SCIENCE 100YRS AGO! . RADIUM IN COSMETOLOGY & MEDICINE BEAUTY ERRORS BUT THE EXPERTS SAID..

Imagine walking into a store and buying radium whitening toothpaste, radioactive anti-aging creams, and radium condoms. The pharmacy offers you radium-based medicines that treat everything from hypertension and diabetes to impotence and depression. At home, you drink radioactive water and go on vacation to resorts with radon baths. No, this is not a nightmare or a horror movie script: less than a hundred years ago, people willingly did all this of their own free will.

In the new episode of ‘How It Was,’ we will tell you about the fortunately short era of the use of radium in the manufacture of medicines, cosmetics, and other products. You will learn what diseases they tried to treat with radium, why counterfeit medicines are sometimes more helpful than real ones, who the radium girls were, and what will happen if you take three bottles of a radioactive drug a day.

Beauty Errors: Radium in Cosmetology and Medicine

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Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

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These Everyday Items Were Dosed With Radium Until We Discovered It Was Toxic

Read More HERE

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Radium Girls1

Read More HERE

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We Used to Put Radium in Coffee

OCTOBER 10, 2012

Radium was discovered by Marie Curie and her husband Pierre in 1898. In 1903, the Royal Academy of Sciences awarded Marie and Pierre Curie and Henri Becquerel the Nobel Prize in Physics, making Marie the first woman to win the prize. Later, in 1911, she would win her second Nobel for isolating radium, discovering another element(polonium), and for her research into the new phenomenon of radioactivity, a word she coined herself.

By 1910, radium was manufactured synthetically in the U.S.  But before the effects of radiation exposure were well understood, radium ended up in a lot of crazy places for its purported magical healing properties and its glow-in-the-dark novelty.

Food products containing radium, like the Radium Schokolade chocolate bar manufactured by Burk & Braun and Hippman-Blach bakery’s Radium Bread, made with radium water, were popular overseas until they were discontinued in 1936.

Read More Here

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Deadly occupation, forged report

Read More HERE

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Cecil Kent Drinker From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Read More HERE

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Radium Girls: A Story of Triumph and Tragedy

https://ugetube.com/watch/radium-girls-a-story-of-triumph-and-tragedy_4RAzqeiVKKM3dGG.html

Mayra – I would just like to say you did an AMAZING AND AWESOME job telling the story of The Radium Girls. I am a high school Chemistry and Human A&P teacher. I always introduce these women when we discuss the Skeletal System In Human A&P and Single Displacement Chemical Reactions in Chemistry. I start off by showing the image of the women and the mirrored images of the skeletons. The students have no prior knowledge and I simply ask them to tell me what they see in the photograph. We then discuss what they think is taking place, and finally what do they wonder about regarding the image. We then begin to dig deeper into what the photograph is actually “saying.” I will   add your video to my resources. Thanks again for all your hard work. You would definitely receive my SCIENTIST OF THE MONTH award. Congratulations!!! Job well done!!!

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Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

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The Radium Dial Painters

I recommend you watch this EXCELLENT 1987 documentary Radium City: The Radium Girls were female factory workers who contracted radiation poisoning from painting.

The Radium Girls were the first people who worked, for years, with one of the worlds most radioactive substances – and suffered the consequences. Hosted by: Hank Green.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

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Radium girls: Environmental history

Sage, 1996

Read More HERE

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How We Realized Putting Radium in Everything Was Not the Answer [The Atlantic]

MARCH 7, 2013

Read More HERE

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Catharine Donohue of Ottowa, Illinois lays dying in July, 1937. She had just won her court case. The news reporting in the 1930s Illinois cases is much more sympathetic than the coverage given to the New Jersey Radium Girls a decade earlier. For example, notice the rallying of family and friends in a supportive context in the photos. It’s also true that in both cases, sensationalism was needed to force justice from industry and the unsympathetic courts. So in that sense, even the worst of the press could be the best of friends for workers. For instance, in the fall of 1927, an enterprising Star Eagle reporter found that U.S. Radium had reached out-of-court settlements with the families of other radium workers in 1926, paying a total of $13,000 in three cases.

The Radium Girls of Ottawa, Illinois

Walter Lippmann, the NY World editor who championed the Radium Girls cause without exploiting their suffering.

Read More HERE

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Radithor (ca. 1928)

Read More HERE

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There is more on Radithor HERE:

Radithor: Owner of the company and Head of the laboratories was William J. A. Bailey, a dropout from Harvard College who was not a medical doctor.

Do you get it? 

The owner of the company and a dropout from Harvard College, who was not a medical doctor.”

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The Radium Girls By Bill Kovarik

Read More HERE

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Now they are promoting genetic modification for everyone.  Like Radium, it’s to be infused into even our food.  We are to be given no choice in the matter as industries, governments, and scientific communities seek to capitalize on their new discovery.  It’s the 1920s and Radium-troubles all over again.

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Advertisement for Undark from 1921

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Photo of Chicago newspaper headline highlighting the plight of the dial painters (Image courtesy of Leonard Grossman.)

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Dial painters’ work room at a radium factory. The large dusty room in the Orange, N.J. radium dial factory in the mid-1920s. (Argonne National Labs)
The Doors of Justice are barred to the “Doomed Radium Victims,” and notes explain that it is due to “statute of limitations, summer vacation, postponement,” in this May 20, 1928 New York World editorial cartoon.

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Close-up of a radium dial painters work station, Ottawa, Illinois. (Courtesy Argonne National Lab).

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Alice Hamilton, MD, Harvard professor of public health, who exposed injustice and occupational hazards of the Radium Girls, lead workers and many others.

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Click a link below to get your copy of The Nuremberg Code.

http://www.environmentandhumanrights.org/resources/Nuremberg%20Code.pdf

2-2-the-nuremberg-code-1Download

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Nuremberg Code Video link

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If you download The Nuremberg Code, understand you have to do something with it.  Please e-mail these folks below:

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It’s actually time to stop talking and stop watching videos and signing useless petitions and do this:

It’s time to get The Hague involved for violations of The Nuremberg Code and Crimes Against Humanity.  Contact them here:

Submit communications to the
Office of the Prosecutor

Information and Evidence Unit
Office of the Prosecutor

Post Office Box 19519
2500 CM The Hague
The Netherlands
otp.informationdesk@icc-cpi.int
Fax +31 70 515 8555

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Trying individuals for genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and aggression

Contact us

Communications and claims under art.15 of the Rome Statute may be addressed to:

Information and Evidence Unit
Office of the Prosecutor
Post Office Box 19519
2500 CM The Hague
The Netherlands

or sent by email to otp.informationdesk@icc-cpi.int

or sent by facsimile to +31 70 515 8555.

The more of us who do this; the more they can’t ignore us.

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