The Girl with a Pearl Earring because of: At Sunnyside – Where Truth and Beauty Meet

Artist Johannes Vermeer (Delft 1632 – 1675 Delft)

Title   Girl with a Pearl Earring

Dated            1665

Girl with a Pearl Earring

Read More HERE

I think it’s safe to say this is my favorite piece of art.  When I’m alone and tired after my studies, I bring her up on my computer screen for company while I relax.

I look into her eyes and wonder what she was thinking so long ago.  I think of her dust manifested in this memory.

I first came to know of the painting after watching the short documentary on her and Vermeer:

.

Girl With The Pearl Earring Trailer

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*¬~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

.

Girl With a Pearl Earring Book Trailer

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*¬~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

.

Vermeer: Master of Light (COMPLETE Documentary) [No Ads]

A fantastic 2001 documentary, with a huge chunk exploring Vermeer’s compositional methods and techniques. Narrated by Meryl Streep

My rebuttal to Tim’s Vermeer:

It’s obvious that Vermeer played around with a camera obscura, but the more likely explanation is that he became so familiar with its optical distortion that he ‘became’ a camera obscura (he adopted its way of seeing as his aesthetic). The placement of his pointillist highlights on the bread in the Milkmaid (for example) is like a how a camera obscura would place highlights on a highly reflective object, but NEVER a loaf of bread. He placed them there because he was creating it in his imagination to look how shinier objects would look through a camera obscura, because he consciously enjoyed the effect of it and created it thus.

If Vermeer were dependent on a bulky optical device he would never have painted the View of Delft — a massive outdoor landscape scene that was certainly created at home. It was generally impossible before the advent of tubed paint to work alla prima outside, and if the camera obscura were a trade secret he would have never have risked using it in public. Vermeer worked it up (along with the ‘Little Street’) from drawings and returned to the studio to make it.

Vermeer painted all of his interiors in the same room of his small house in Delft, yet the windows, the floor, the walls etc. always look different. Why? Because he was creating them in his head to look like a camera obscura, but not slavishly with a camera obscura.

Finally, X rays of Vermeer’s paintings show that he reworked the placement of things over and over — meaning he was building from imagination, not directly from an optical device.

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*¬~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

.

The Girl in the Spotlight – Steps of Vermeer

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*¬~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

.

I could look at Vermeer forever.  His paintings calm me.  Much like this man here:

.

Vermeer – Fascinatie van nu

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*¬~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

.

Vermeer’s Mania for Maps

No other painter from 17th-century Holland expressed a greater interest in cartography than Jan Vermeer. His detailed depictions of maps and globes coincide with the great age of exploration and mapmaking. This lecture by the leading authority on Vermeer’s use of cartographic material demonstrates that all of the maps and globes in Vermeer’s paintings can be identified, though few originals still exist. These cartographic objects and the ways in which Vermeer used them not only add further meaning to his allegorical subjects and scenes of everyday life; they also shed light on Vermeer’s working method, including his possible use of the camera obscura.

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*¬~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

.

A new research project at the Mauritshuis in The Hague hopes to unlock some of the mysteries that surround Vermeer’s masterpiece. Watch the video to find out more.

Watch Video HERE

.

You can find the museum’s YouTube page here:

.

Het Mauritshuis

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFsCwq3z5Pq3sjoTQa7-_ow

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*¬~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

.

A page exists to help you explore Vermeer’s colorations:

.

Johannes Vermeer, Girl With a Pearl Earring

Read More HERE

.

Johannes Vermeer

Girl with a Pearl Earring

1665 On view in Room 15

A young woman looks over her shoulder at us. She holds her head slightly to one side, there is a gleam in her greyish-blue eyes, and her lips are slightly parted and moist. On her head is a turban that she has wound from two pieces of material, one blue and one yellow, and she is adorned with a pearl earring. It is from this oversized jewel in the middle of the composition that the painting derives its title.

The painting provides a rich sample of every aspect of Vermeer’s virtuoso painting technique. The face is modelled very softly, not in great detail but with gradual transitions and invisible brushstrokes. The clothing is depicted more schematically and enlivened with small dots of paint suggesting reflected light – one of Vermeer’s trademark features. Even so, the artist has clearly indicated differences between materials – for instance between the white collar, painted in impasto, and the drier paint of the turban, for which he used the precious pigment ultramarine. But the most remarkable detail is the pearl. This consists of little more than two brushstrokes: a bright highlight at upper left and the soft reflection of the white collar on the underside.

Seventeenth-century Dutch girls did not wear turbans. With this accessory Vermeer has given the girl an Oriental air. Images like this were known in the seventeenth century as tronies. Tronies are not portraits: they were not made in order to produce the best possible likeness of an individual. Although there would probably be a sitter, the point of a tronie was mainly to make a study of a head representing a particular character or type. Rembrandt had popularised tronies in Dutch art around 1630. He made dozens of them, often using himself as the model, sometimes wearing a remarkable cap or a helmet.

The pearl is too large to be real. Perhaps the girl is wearing a pearl drop made of glass, which has been varnished to give it a matte sheen. Another possibility, of course, is that the pearl was a product of Vermeer’s imagination. Pearls – both real and imitation – were fashionable in the period from about 1650 to 1680. We often find them in paintings by Frans van Mieris, Gabriel Metsu and Gerard ter Borch.
 
Girl with a Pearl Earring has been known to the general public only since 1881, when it was put up for auction at the Venduhuis der Notarissen in The Hague. On the viewing day it attracted the attention of the influential cultural official Victor de Stuers, who was there together with his friend and neighbour, the art collector A.A. des Tombe. Tradition has it that even though the painting had been badly neglected, De Stuers recognised it as a Vermeer. According to a different version of the story, the painting was too dirty to be properly appraised, and the painter’s identity only became clear later on, when the cleaning operation revealed his signature. Whatever the case may be, De Stuers and Des Tombe agreed not to bid against each other, and Des Tombe therefore acquired the painting for the negligible sum of two guilders plus thirty cents mark-up.

Des Tombe’s collection, which included works by contemporaries as well as old masters, was open to visitors at his home, at Parkstraat 26 in The Hague. The future director of the Mauritshuis, Abraham Bredius, was the first to extol the virtues of Girl with a Pearl Earring when he saw it at Parkstraat in 1885: ‘Vermeer overshadows all the rest; the girl’s head, so superbly modelled that one is almost inclined to forget one is looking at a painting, and that single gleam of light, will alone hold your attention’. When he died, on 16 December 1902, Des Tombe turned out to have made a secret will bequeathing twelve paintings to the Mauritshuis, including Girl with a Pearl Earring.

(this is a reworked version of a text published in in: P. van der Ploeg, Q. Buvelot, Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis: A princely collection, The Hague 2005, pp. 256-258)

Read More HERE

.

About Johannes Vermeer:

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*¬~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

Good night Girl…

3 thoughts on “The Girl with a Pearl Earring because of: At Sunnyside – Where Truth and Beauty Meet

Add yours

    1. I thought of you last night. I was tired and discourage then I remembered ‘my girl.’

      I put her up on the screen next to me and we stared at each other for a bit.

      Then I just had to share my love of Vermeer with all of you.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: